1-800-773-8400 or 1-603-225-8400 (NH only Information & Resource)

1-800-444-6443 (National toll-free Brain Injury Resource Line)

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Acute Rehabilitation Hospital:
Acute rehabilitation provides a full complement of allied health therapies such as rehabilitation medicine, neuropsychology, occupational, physical, recreational, respiratory and speech therapies. Depending upon medical stability, the focus is on developing basic skills such as bowel and bladder control, communication, mobility, basic hygiene, orientation and learning. Acute rehabilitation hospitals provide services and care to patients of all ages, with a variety of rehabilitation needs that are not necessarily specific to brain injury.
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Reference: American Academy for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists (AACBIS) Training Manual, Second Edition, 1998.

Area Agencies:
Ten regional Area Agencies determine eligibility for state services. Individuals living with a brain injury or developmental disability may be found eligible for case management, family support, early supports and services, respite, residential or day services.

Day Services:
Program that delivers rehabilitative services in a community setting and focuses on developing the life skills necessary to function in society.

Department of Health and Human Services ­ Bureau of Behavioral Health:
Community mental health centers are located in ten regions of the state and provide mental health services. Eligible persons include people with who have experienced life-changing events and or illnesses that are in need of support in order to cope to achieve a better quality of life.

Office of Alcohol and Drug Policy:
The office of Alcohol and Drug Policy has 5 regional coordinators who provide resources, technical assistance and community organization for any person or group concerned with substance abuse issues. The Division can provide a Resource Guide covering resource numbers for outpatient treatment services, crisis/sobriety maintenance services, information and education. Call the number of the region closest to you to request information and services in your area.

Educational Services through New Hampshire Department of Education ­ Bureau of Special Education:
Education to children 3 to 21 years of age with disabilities including acquired brain disorder, regardless of the nature and severity of their disabilities. To receive special education services, the child must be deemed educationally challenged by the school district's evaluation team. New Hampshire State statutes apply to all educationally challenged youth until they have received a high school diploma or reached age 21, whichever occurs first. A school district may also determine that the student no longer requires special education based on established standards. You may obtain the special education district office location closest to you by calling (603) 271-3741. Private schools focus on the special needs on the person seeking education, serving ages 5yrs ­ 22yrs.

Guardianship:
A person who is legally appointed to act on behalf of a person who has lost the physical or mental ability to care for his/her own health and safety. The guardian often manages the person´s affairs.

Home Health Services:
Organizations that provide a variety of services to meet the health care needs of people in there own homes.

Housing Assistance:
Assistance to all people´ income eligible as set by HUD guidelines. Programs consist of rental assistance and homeownership options. Contact the Housing Authority nearest you to obtain information/applications and whether the Authority administers a Section 8 Program or a Public Housing Program.

Long Term Care:
Promotes cost containment and a stable quality of life in the least restrictive active treatment environment possible. Models of care include residential, community and group home settings with varying levels of support, based on the individual´s needs.

Long Term Care Rehabilitation:
Promotes cost containment and a stable quality of life in the least restrictive active treatment environment possible. Models of care include residential, community and group home settings with varying levels of support, based on the individual's need. *Reference: American Academy for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists (AACBIS) Training Manual, Second Edition, 1998.

Neurologist:
A medical specialist in disorders of the nervous system. Performs neurological evaluations for the diagnosis and treatment of brain injury, seizures and headaches.

Neuropsychiatrist:
A medical specialist who concentrates on behaviors, personality change, mood change and sleep/wake cycle changes related to brain injury and altered function. Their involvement in rehabilitation includes diagnosing, monitoring and prescribing medications that can complement neural recovery and help prevent disruptive behaviors.

Neuropsychologist:
A psychologist who specializes in brain­behavior relationships. Administers tests in order to evaluate a person's, cognitive, emotional, intellectual, and academic/vocational skills.

Nursing Homes:
24 hour nursing care staffed by registered nurses, social workers and aides. Some facilities offer temporary respite care.

Physiatrist:
A physician specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation.

Post-Acute Residential Rehabilitation:
Includes a variety of levels, costs and lengths of care given the long-term nature of brain injury. Post-acute treatment primarily involves residential programs that functionally apply and adapt treatment into everyday activities. Treatment environments are normalized, highly structured and functional. Treatment focuses on maximizing basic functional skills and addressing psychosocial and behavioral adjustment issues. Post-acute facilities can be licensed in a variety of categories such as Residential Facilities, Residential Treatment and Rehabilitation Facilities, Group Homes or Supported Living Facilities. They may offer occupational, speech and physical therapy and may specialize in Transitional Treatment, Neurobehavioral, Vocational Training and/or Community Re-entry. *Reference: American Academy for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists (AACBIS) Training Manual, Second Edition, 1998.


Post-Acute Supported Community Living:
Treatment focuses on maximizing basic functional skills and addressing psychosocial and behavioral adjustment issues within a community living setting.

Residential Services (In-Home Supports):
Treatment focuses on maximizing basic functional skills and addressing psychosocial and behavioral adjustment issues within ones home.

Residential Care:
Home-like atmosphere for minimal assistance needs. Provides supervision, socialization, room and board. These facilities do not provide nursing care.
Respite Care: Respite services are supports provided to a person so that their family and/or primary caregivers can have relief. Respite can be secured on a planned or crisis basis either for a temporary or limited time.

Social Security Administration:
Information regarding Retirement Benefits, Disability Benefits, Supplemental Security, Medicare, and Survivors Benefits. To contact the national office, call (800) 772-1213 or refer to the SSA website at http://www.ssa.gov.

Specialized Nursing Facilities:
Private treatment facilities that provide intensive specialized care.

Sub-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital (A-typical/Brain Injury):
An acquired brain injury specific rehabilitation facility may be licensed as a Special Hospital/Rehabilitation, or as a Special Hospital having licensed skilled nursing beds. Patients must be medically stable, non-self medicating and in need of 24 hour skilled nursing in addition to their need for acquired brain injury rehabilitation. These facilities serve people having a variable risk of potential medical instability, multiple/complex nursing needs and a potential for needing high medical acuity skilled nursing. Sub-acute, hospital-based rehabilitation facilities provide a full complement of allied health therapies include: rehabilitation medicine, neuropsychology, psychology, occupational, physical, recreational, cognitive, speech and pre-vocational therapies with special emphasis on activities of daily living (ADL) and community living skills (CLS). Depending on medical stability, special focus is on developing basic skills such as bowel and bladder control, communication, mobility, basic hygiene, orientation learning and memory. *Reference: American Academy for the Certification of Brain Injury Specialists (AACBIS) Training Manual, Second Edition, 1998.

Supported Residential Care:
24-hour supervision and assistance with daily living skills, medications and health needs. Provides limited nursing care with some facilities offering temporary respite care.

Vocational Rehabilitation:
Program that helps one develop employment skills and assists with job placement in the community.


Support Services